Independence Celebration Activities Planned at Oglebay on July 3rd & 4th

Fireworks at Oglebay on July 3

The fireworks will begin at 9:30 pm on July 3 at Schenk Lake with special patriotic music presented in conjunction with the fireworks. The Subway Show Band will perform at the lake from 6:30 to 9:30 pm.

An exciting Independence Celebration is planned at Oglebay on Wednesday, July 3 and Thursday, July 4. “The most-popular event, the fireworks display, will take place on Wednesday, July 3, at Schenk Lake,” said John Hargleroad, Operations Director for the Wheeling Park Commission.  The fireworks will begin at 9:30 p.m. with special patriotic music presented in conjunction with the fireworks. “The event is an annual tribute to Albert Schenk, and features inspiring patriotic music and fireworks,” said Hargleroad. Wednesday’s festivities at the lake also include picnic-style food service from 5:00 to 9:00 p.m. and the Subway Show Band performing at the lake from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m.

 

New activities on Wednesday, July 3, include Fort Henry Re-enactors at the Wagon Shed Shelter across from Schenk Lake from 12:00 to 8:00 p.m. and an Ice Carving demonstration by Chris Kefauver from 7:00 to 8:00 p.m. at the Wagon Shed.

 

Oglebay Stables

Free tours of the Oglebay Stables plus ½ off pony rides during the Independence Celebration. Trail rides are also available by reservation.

On Wednesday from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. the Oglebay Stables will be offering free tours plus half off on pony rides from 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.  “No reservations are required for the pony rides but call 304-243-4042 to schedule a trail ride,” added Hargleroad.  The pony ride special will also be offered on Thursday, July 4 from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

 

Inflatable rides and a rock wall will be at the Schenk Lake area from 1:00 to 5:00 p.m. on both Wednesday and Thursday. The inflatable rides start at $1.00 per ride and the rock wall is $5.00.

 

Schenk Lake at Oglebay

Schenk Lake will be the hub of activities for the Independence Celebration at Oglebay on Wed, July 3 & Thurs, July 4. Inflatable rides and a rock wall will be at the lake area both days and Wednesday’s activities at the lake also include Fort Henry re-enactors, ice-carving demonstration and special picnic food service. The Independence Celebration is also a great time to try out the Aqua Cycles.

Activity wristbands are available every day during the summer at the Good Zoo and Visitors Center and provide all day admission to: Par III Golf, Good Zoo & Train Ride, Miniature Golf, Pedal Boats, Fishing, Outdoor Pool, Tennis, Glass Museum & Craftsman Center, Trolley and Mansion Museum. Rental equipment is not included. Wristbands are $16.00 each and one free ride on the inflatable rides is included with the purchase of a wristband.

 

The Independence Celebration is also a great time to catch up with old friends at the Good Zoo and check out what’s new including the life-size, moving and roaring dinosaurs.  The zoo will present “Dino Talk” with the baby T-Rex on Wednesday, July 3, from 1:00 to 4:00 p.m.  The animal care staff will be doing animal enrichment activities from 1:00. to 4:00 p.m. both days  including special red, white and blue treats and special activities to give the animals something fun to explore. “Come watch the animals play!” added Miller.

 

Dinosaurs at the Oglebay Good Zoo

Oglebay’s Independence Celebration is a great time to see the life-size, moving and roaring dinosaurs that have invaded the Good Zoo for the summer. The animal care staff will be doing animal enrichment activities from 1:00. to 4:00 p.m. on both Wednesday, July 3 and Thursday, July 4.

The zoo opens daily at 10:00 a.m. during the summer. Admission to the zoo is $9.00 for non-member adults and $5.75 for ages 3-12.  Zoo members and ages 2 and under are free.

 

Aqua Cycles, pedal boats, fishing and miniature golf are available all summer at Schenk Lake.  “The aqua cycles are great fun and great exercise,” said Hargleroad.

 

“And our Segway Tours are back so visitors can join our friendly guides for an exciting tour on a high tech personal transporter,” added Hargleroad. Segway Tours are offered at 10:00 a.m., 12:00 p.m., 2:00 p.m. and 4:00 p.m., beginning at Schenk Lake.  Advance reservations can be made for the Segways by calling 304-243-4090.

 

The Ihlenfeld Dining Room at Wilson Lodge has great new events this summer including Linguini’s Trattoria on Wednesday and Platters Family Style on Thursday.  Brian Burkley, Director of Oglebay Food and Beverage described Linguini’s as “an interactive Italian experience for the entire family.”

 

Ihlenfeld Dining Room at Oglebay

The Ihlenfeld Dining Room at Wilson Lodge has great new events this summer including Linguini’s Trattoria on Wednesday and Platters Family Style on Thursday. Families will love both events!

“Families will love both events,” added Burkley.  “Wednesday’s Linguini’s menu features pasta, pizza, soup, salads and desserts, and the Thursday night Platters menu features comfort food served family style.”

 

The dining room also has the Seafood Gala on Friday evenings and the Smokehouse on Saturday evenings this summer.  All events are from 5:00 to 9:00 p.m. and reservations can be made by calling 304-243-4080.

 

“For those who want to celebrate the holiday with an all-American picnic, many beautiful picnic sites are available at Oglebay and can be reserved by calling 304-243-4010,” added Hargleroad.

 

For more information on the 4th of July celebration, call the Oglebay Visitors Center at 304-243-4010.

Baby birds and fawns? Let them be.

Doe with her fawn

If you find a baby deer all by itself the Good Zoo staff says “Please leave it alone.” Newborn fawns cannot follow their moms around until they are about two weeks old so the doe parks her fawn in tall grass or shrubs, and returns only to feed it, so as not to attract predators to the baby.

Found a baby deer all by itself? “Please leave it alone.”  That’s the advice of Good Zoo staff, who receive multiple phone calls every day about “abandoned” fawns that aren’t abandoned at all. Worse yet, some well-meaning folks are actually driving up to the zoo’s doors with fawns. “People get really upset that we won’t take it, but there is absolutely no reason for us to, plus it is illegal,” said Penny Miller, zoo director. Newborn fawns cannot follow their moms around until they are about two weeks old, unlike other hoof-stock like zebras. So the doe parks her fawn in tall grass or shrubs, and returns only to feed it, so as not to attract predators to the baby. “White-tailed deer are not out there in droves abandoning their babies,” Miller added.

 

“Like kids, the babies don’t always stay put, and may follow a person. Just shoo it away back into cover,” Miller advised.  Misplaced fawns bleet out to their moms, and the doe will call back and find them.  Fawns are born in late May and into June, so the phone calls are piling in now at the zoo.

 

Bluebird eggs

Once baby birds hatch they leave the nest feathered but unable to fly for a few days until they build up flight muscles. If you find a fledgling bird pick it up and put it 4-6 feet off the ground and keep kids, cats and dogs away. The mother bird will feed it.

The same advice goes for baby birds, which leave the nest feathered, but lack tail feathers, and are unable to fly for a few days until they build up flight muscles. Pick up the fledgling bird and put it 4-6 feet off the ground and keep kids, cats and dogs away. The mother bird will feed it. “Touching a baby bird or fawn does not make the mother reject it, said Mindi White, manager of Animal Husbandry. “That’s an old wive’s tale that we just cannot seem to correct.  We also handle all our mammal and avian zoo babies for physical exams and weighing; mom takes them right back.” Birds have no sense of smell, and all mother animals have strong maternal bonds to their babies.

 

“We have lots of great stories of babies being taken back out where they were found, and the mother comes back and claims them,” Miller said. The zoo receives dozens of  calls per day about baby birds and fawns.

 

“We don’t have the staff time or cage space to take these animals, either. Our keepers are busy caring for our collection animals and monitoring our own new zoo babies,” said Miller. “Go on the Internet and do some research before you intervene. When baby animals are truly orphaned due to mom being hit by a car, rehabilitation is a costly, time consuming task done only by licensed wildlife rehabilitators common in Ohio and Pennsylvania but rare in West Virginia.  “You can search for licensed wildlife rehabilitators on the internet if you are certain the mother animal has been killed,” White added.

Annual Bulb Sale at the Oglebay Palm Room Continues

Tulips at OglebayThe annual bulb sale at the Oglebay Palm Room is coming to a close.   “While supplies last you can now buy one bag for $10 and get the second bag free,” said Marilyn Jenkinson, Manager of the Greenhouse and Gardens at Oglebay.  “The money raised during the annual bulb sale helps us purchase new bulbs from The Netherlands that will be planted this fall.”

 

Last fall hundreds of spring flowering bulbs including tulips and daffodils were planted in the formal gardens at Oglebay Park and now that the bulbs have finished blooming they have been removed from the ground to make way for summer annuals.

 

The Palm Room is currently open daily from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.  Call 304-243-4098 for more information.

Memorial Day Weekend Celebration at Oglebay

The Memorial Day Weekend marks the start of summer activities at Oglebay and John Hargleroad, Director of Operations, says that all the Oglebay facilities will be open beginning Friday, May 24 with some special activities planned for the Memorial Day weekend.

 

Aqua cycles, pedal boats, fishing at Schenk Lake at Oglebay

Aqua Cycles and pedal boats will be one of the many activities available at Schenk Lake at Oglebay during the Memorial Day weekend. Inflatable rides and Doozy the Clown will also be at the lake Saturday, May 25 through Monday, May 27.

“The always-popular inflatable rides will be at the Schenk Lake area on Saturday, Sunday and Monday from 1:00 to 5:00 p.m. and Doozy the Clown will also be at the lake area all three days from 1:00 to 4:00 p.m.,” said Hargleroad.

 

Oglebay will begin offering daily activity wristbands on Friday, May 24.  The wristbands are available at the Good Zoo and Visitors Center through Labor Day and provide all day use at the Par III Golf, Good Zoo and Train Ride, Miniature Golf, Pedal Boats, Fishing, Outdoor Pool, Tennis, Glass Museum, Trolley, and the Mansion Museum. “The wristbands will also provide one admission to the inflatable rides this weekend,” reminded Hargleroad. The wristbands are $16.00 each plus applicable fees and taxes.

 

The Memorial Day Weekend is also a great time to catch up with old friends at the Good Zoo and check out what’s new including the Dinosaur exhibit.  On Saturday, May 25, the zoo will hold “Dino Discussions,” from 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

 

New mongoose lemurs at the Good Zoo at Oglebay

All animals will be on exhibit at the Good Zoo during the Memorial Day Weekend including the new mongoose lemurs. These highly endangered lemurs are now part of the Animal Encounters program that allow zoo guests to get into animal exhibits with the keepers to help feed and train some of the animals including the red pandas, river otters, kangaroos and ring-tailed lemurs. The special Dinosaur exhibit at the Good Zoo continues through Labor Day.

The zoo is also accepting entries for the second annual “Capture the Wild” photography contest.  “We had a great response last summer to our photography contest and are looking forward to this year’s entries,” said Penny Miller, Director of the Good Zoo.  “We’ll be awarding some great prizes!” Contest rules and entry forms are available on the zoo’s website at www.oglebay-resort.com/goodzoo.

 

Miller also added that the zoo’s Animal Encounters programs are getting more and more popular.  “This program allows guests to get into animal exhibits with the keepers to help feed and train some of the zoo’s animals including the new mongoose lemurs,” said Miller. Animal Encounters also include the ring-tailed lemurs, red pandas, river otters and kangaroos. The encounters must be scheduled in advance by calling 304-243-4030.

 

The Good Zoo is open daily at 10 am. Admission is $9.00 for adults, $5.75 for ages 3-12, and ages 2 & under and members are free.

 

The popular Segway Tours have also returned for another season.  “Join our friendly guides for an exciting tour on a high tech personal transporter,” said Hargleroad.  “It’s a great way to experience the picturesque natural beauty of Oglebay.” The tours begin at Schenk Lake at 10:00 a.m., 12:00 p.m., 2:00 p.m. and 4:00 p.m. Reservations for Segway Tours can be made by calling 304-243-4090.

 

Seafood Gala at Ihlenfeld Dining Room

Beginning Memorial Day Weekend several special dining events will be offered at the Ihlenfeld Dining Room at Wilson Lodge including the Seafood Gala every Friday evening. Other new dining events planned for this summer are Linguini's Italian Trattoria every Wednesday, Platters Family Style every Thursday, and The Smokehouse featuring Prime Rib every Saturday. Call 304-243-4080 for reservations.

The Easy Street Band will present a free concert at the Anne Kuchinka Amphitheater on Sunday from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.  “This performance is the beginning of the Summer Sunday Entertainment Series featuring a different band every Sunday through Labor Day at the amphitheater,” added Hargleroad. The entire summer’s schedule is available at www.oglebay-resort.com/summer_ent.htm.

 

“For those who want to celebrate the weekend with an all-American picnic, many beautiful picnic sites are available at Oglebay and can be reserved by calling 304-243-4010,” added Hargleroad.

 

The Seafood Gala is available at the Ihlenfeld Dining Room at Wilson Lodge on Friday evening and the new Smokehouse, featuring Prime Rib, is offered on Saturday evening.  For dining reservations call 304-243-4080.

Bloch Memorial Golf Course Dedication at Wheeling Park

Bloch Memorial Golf Course at Wheeling Park

Left to right: Randy Worls, Chairman of the Oglebay Foundation; Stuart Bloch; Doug Dalby, CEO of the Wheeling Park Commission; Bill Jones, Chairman of the Wheeling Park Commission; and Eriks Janelsins, President of the Oglebay Foundation on May 8, 2013 at the dedication of the Bloch Memorial Golf Course at Wheeling Park.

Wheeling Park’s 88-year old golf course, Wheeling’s first public golf course, was recently dedicated as the Bloch Memorial Golf Course.  Stuart F. Bloch, Wheeling businessman/philanthropist, has established a generous endowment gift to provide annual improvements for the golf course at Wheeling Park.

 

The Bloch family has been involved with golf in Wheeling for many generations. Bloch’s great-great-grandfather, Samual S. Bloch, a co-founder of Bloch Brothers Tobacco, was also a founder of the Wheeling Highlands Course that became Wheeling Country Club. He learned the game from his grandfather, Jesse, and father, Tom.  Tom Bloch also served as a charter trustee of the E.W. Oglebay Memorial Fund. This fund started with a gift from Sarita Oglebay Russel and it continues to support activities at Oglebay.

 

Bloch’s love for the game led him from caddying at local links to the presidency of both the West Virginia Golf Association and the United States Golf Association (USGA). He also learned to appreciate the benefits of this life-time sport. “A golf course like the one at Wheeling Park can suit a person all of his or her life,” Bloch said. “It’s both a good course on which to learn and a fine place to continue playing as a senior citizen.”

 

“Stuart Bloch’s endowment gift will assure the Wheeling Park course will be well preserved for future generations,” said Randy Worls, chairman of The Oglebay Foundation. “Stuart Bloch is a visionary, as shown by his civic volunteerism in many areas, and he appreciates those factors that make our community very livable for residents in all stages of their lives.”

 

Doug Dalby, CEO of the Wheeling Park Commission, reinforced that endowment gifts such as Bloch’s will assure the continued operation of the historic course and allow user rates to remain as low as possible. “Just as his family enjoyed participating in park activities, Stuart’s wish is that all residents can access golf at well-maintained facilities at a reasonable cost,” added Dalby.

 

The Bloch Memorial Golf Course remains as popular as the year it was built. The course was designed by the late Robert E. “Bob” Biery, the first employee hired by the Wheeling Park Commission (WPC). Park officials did not anticipate a rush to the links, but more than 6,000 rounds were played on the course between its opening on July 1, 1925 and October, when the park closed for the season.

Annual Bulb Sale Underway at the Oglebay Palm Room

Spring bulbs for sale at Oglebay

Now that the tulips at Oglebay are finished blooming the bulbs are being dug up to make way for summer annuals. The bulbs are now on sale to the public at the Oglebay Palm Room to raise money for new bulbs to be planted this fall for next spring’s display.

Last fall, hundreds of tulip, daffodil and muscari bulbs were planted in the formal gardens at Oglebay Park, and now that the bulbs have finished blooming they have been removed from the ground to make way for summer annuals.  The bulbs are now on sale to the public at the Oglebay Palm Room for $10 a bag.

 

“The money raised during the annual bulb sale helps us purchase new bulbs from The Netherlands that will be planted this fall,” said Marilyn Archer, Manager of the Greenhouse and Gardens at Oglebay.

 

Archer added that the Palm Room, located next to the greenhouse, is fully stocked with flowering plants, annuals and perennials plus unique garden accessories.

 

The Palm Room is currently open daily from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.  Call 304-243-4098 for more information.

Oglebay Hilltop Shops Celebrate Spring

Discover Spring at Oglebay Palm Room

Kim Young, Horticulture Technician and AAS All-American Selections Display Garden Coordinator, displays a designer container at Oglebay’s Palm Room and Greenhouses. Designer Containers and Deer Resistant Plants and Chemicals is one of the special lectures scheduled during “Dream … Discover Spring at the Hilltop” on Saturday May 4 and Sunday May 5, 2013.

On Saturday, May 4 and Sunday, May 5, 2013, the Palm Room and Greenhouses, Farmhouse Sweets and Treats Shoppe, and Carriage House Glass Shops at Oglebay will celebrate May with “Dream … Discover Spring at the Hilltop.”  Marilyn Archer, Palm Room and Greenhouse/Garden Manager said all the hilltop shops are filled with new arrivals for Spring including new flowering plants and merchandise at the Palm Room, and new fresh-made fudge at Farmhouse Sweets and Treats Shoppe.

 

Archer said the celebration will take place on both days from 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. with giveaways and lectures.  The lectures will take place at the Palm Room and Saturday’s schedule is: 11:00 a.m. – Fantasy Miniature Gardens; 1:00 p.m. – Succulent Wreaths, Living Walls and Kokedama Moss Balls; 2:00 p.m. – Composting, Herbs and Vegetables; 3:00 p.m. – Designer Containers and Deer Resistant Plants and Chemicals.

 

Sunday’s lectures at the Palm Room are: 11:00 a.m. – Succulent Wreaths, Living Walls and Kokedama Moss Balls; 1:00 p.m. – Fantasy Miniature Gardens; 2:00 p.m. – All American Selection Plants; 3:00 p.m. – Designer Containers and Deer Resistant Plants and Chemicals.

 

“Visitors will have the chance to win a beautiful gift basket at the Palm Room, a gift basket at Farmhouse Sweets and Treats and decorative glass at Carriage House Glass,” added Archer.

 

For more information call 304-243-4098.

Good Zoo at Oglebay Offers Exclusive Safari to Tanzania

An informative meeting about the Safari to Tanzania will be held at the Good Zoo on Saturday, April 27 at 1:30 p.m. The meeting will include photographs, food, packing tips and provide answers to all questions!

Good Zoo at Oglebay Offers Exclusive Safari to Tanzania

Penny Miller, Director of the Good Zoo at Oglebay, with several members of a Maasai village during a safari in Africa. The zoo is offering another exclusive safari to Tanzania this fall that will include some of the best wildlife spotting on the continent.

The Good Zoo is offering an exclusive safari to Tanzania. The trip will be fully escorted by Penny Miller, Director of the Good Zoo, from October 27 to November 8, 2013.  “This trip will allow you to discover quintessential African landscapes when you explore Tanzania, the perfect East African destination for any traveler with an open mind and heart to experiencing wildlife and culture, past and present,” said Miller. “A relaxed attitude combined with some of the best wildlife spotting on the continent is within affordable reach.”  Miller has led previous zoo safaris to Kenya, South Africa, Botswana, Zimbabwe and Zambia.

 

This exclusive safari will cover unforgettable spots including the unique eco-system of Ngorongoro Crater, the vast savannahs of the Serengeti, and the flamingo-lined shores of Lake Manyara.  Visitors can expect to see a variety of wildlife including buffalo, wildebeest, impala, giraffe, zebra, black-maned lions, black rhinos and the elusive tree-climbing lions with glimpses of leopard, cheetah, hyena, jackal, elephant, and warthog. The trip will also include a visit to Olduvai Gorge where the roots of modern man were unearthed by the Leakeys, plus a visit to a Maasai village.

 

Good Zoo at Oglebay Offers Exclusive Safari to TanzaniaInclusions to the safari:

  • Flights within Africa as specified. On the main safari in Tanzania: Serengeti to Arusha. On the extension, flight between Arusha/Zanzibar.
  • Superior accommodations throughout.
  • All meals on safari in Tanzania as well as in Zanzibar.
  • All wildlife viewing by private 4X4 vehicle with photo roof, driven by a naturalist guide. A window seat is guaranteed.
  • Visit to a Maasai village.
  • Complimentary bottled water in vehicles and during meals.
  • Professional naturalist will accompany the group with 10 travelers on the main safari.
  • Penny Miller will accompany the group with a minimum 10 travelers on the main tour and 6 travelers on the extension.
  • All applicable hotel and lodge taxes and gratuities.
  • All park entry fees.
  • Complimentary passport wallets and luggage tags.

 

Good Zoo at Oglebay Offers Exclusive Safari to TanzaniaThe cost of the trip is $5,695 per person for double occupancy plus $2,200 per person for round trip air from Pittsburgh.  An optional six day extension to Zanzibar from November 7 to 12, 2013 is an additional $2,195 per person.

 

For the full itinerary and to make reservations visit the Good Zoo website or contact Penny Miller at the Good Zoo by calling 304-243-4027.

Rare Wild Dog Birth at Good Zoo

African wild dog pups born at Good Zoo at Oglebay

Two African wild Dog pups that were born at the zoo in September 2012 are now on exhibit. African wild dogs are Africa’s second most endangered carnivores.

Good Zoo staff announced that highly endangered African Wild Dog pups born at the Good Zoo are now on exhibit.  The female “Destiny” gave birth on September 30, 2012 to seven pups; it is the first litter she or her mate “Selous” have produced.

 

“All the pups were full term, but below normal birth weight, and were born with infections that affected their lungs and other organs,” said Good Zoo Manager Mindi White.  “One pup was stillborn due to undeveloped lungs. The remaining pups were pulled for hand-rearing but four pups succumbed to the infection.”  White said the remaining two pups were too weak to nurse from Destiny, so zoo staff located a lactating domestic dog  from the Hancock County Animal Shelter and nursed the pups for several days until she stopped producing milk.  Keepers took the pups back to the parents every day and let them see, hear and smell the pups through the fence to let them know the pups were still alive.

 

African wild dog pups born at Good Zoo at Oglebay

Two African wild dog pups that were born at the Good Zoo in September were nursed by a domestic dog and hand-raised by zoo staff. Penny Miller, zoo director, said this is the first time nursing wild dog pups have been hand-reared by zoo staff, yet kept with the parents during the day.

When the pups were stronger and healthier and the parents were still showing strong parental behaviors, the pups were put back with the parents. The pups still did not nurse adequately from Destiny, so animal care staff took the pups home every night for late night and 2:00 a.m. feedings. The pups were put back with the wild dog parents during the day. “This is the first time nursing wild dog pups have been hand-reared by zoo staff, yet kept with the parents during the day,“  said Penny Miller, zoo director. If the pups had been only hand raised, they imprint on people and do not learn correct wild dog behaviors. “This would have made it impossible to integrate them back into African Wild Dog conservation program, which is the whole point of our breeding efforts,” Miller added.

 

“These pups were born very compromised. It is a miracle two survived, and it is a testimony to the incredible problem solving and tender loving care they received from our keepers and managers,” Miller said.  The domestic dog that helped rear the pups was adopted by a Good Zoo keeper.  African wild dogs are Africa’s second most endangered carnivores. Once found in 39 countries in sub-Saharan Africa, wild dogs are no longer found in 25 countries.  Habitat destruction, rabies and canine distemper spread by local village dogs, and other pressures threaten their survival. Only the dominant female dog in the pack produces pups, litters can be as large as 20 pups.  Other females assist the mother in rearing the pups and catching wild game.  It takes a large healthy pack of wild dogs to hunt enough game to feed large litters; many wild packs are now too small to rear large litters. Pup mortality in the wild is 90%.  There are 125 African wild dogs exhibited in 37 U.S. zoos; approximately 3,500-5,000 remain in the wild.

 

African wild dog pups born at Good Zoo at Oglebay

The entire wild dog family is now on exhibit at the zoo!

The zoo is currently open daily from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.  Admission to the Good Zoo is $9.00 for adults; $5.75 for children ages 3-12; and Good Zoo members and ages 2 and under are admitted free.  Lorikeet Landing and the train ride are open Saturday and Sunday from 10:30 am to 3:30 pm, weather permitting.  The train ride is $2.25 per person and a cup of nectar to feed to the lorikeets is $1.00.  Additional information can be found on the on the Good Zoo website including the new Dinosaur Exhibit featuring life-sized, moving and roaring dinosaurs.

Back from Extinction – Dinosaurs Invade Good Zoo

Dinosaur Exhibit at the Good Zoo at Oglebay

A Juvenile T –Rex roars at the new Dinosaur Exhibit at the Good Zoo at Oglebay. The life-sized, moving and roaring dinosaurs will greet zoo visitors throughout the summer.

Five life-sized dinosaurs, and one off-spring, have arrived at the Good Zoo at Oglebay, and will greet zoo visitors throughout the summer.  “The dinosaurs are fitted with an electric brain so they move and roar, and can be discovered in the woods near the Australian Exhibit,” said Penny Miller, Director of the Good Zoo.

 

Miller said the entire zoo staff has been working with a paleontologist.  “The staff is well-versed on the dinosaurs that are currently on exhibit and are prepared to pass on this information to all visitors,” said Miller.  Paleontologists continue to find new dig sites and new dinosaur species, and advanced tools and new discoveries have led to new conclusions about dinosaurs. “Museums have had to change exhibits numerous times as paleontology forms a more accurate picture of dinosaurs,” said Miller.

 

The dinosaurs at the Good Zoo this summer include a large Styracosaurus and her baby, a Dilophosaurus, a Juvenile T –Rex, a Deltadromeus and Parasaurolophus. The Parasaurolophus is non-robotic so visitors can sit on it and take their photo or video, but all other dinosaurs are robotic and move and roar.

 

Dinosaur Exhibit at the Good Zoo at Oglebay

Vincent O’Leary, educator at the Good Zoo, welcomes visitors to the new Dinosaur Exhibit, and stands in front of the mama Styracosaurus. The staff is well-versed on the dinosaurs that are currently on exhibit and are happy to pass on this information to all visitors.

The Styracosaurus, whose name means “Spiked Lizard” was found in North America and Asia during the late cretaceous period. This species had six large spikes coming from the large frill on the back of the head, two horns on the upper mouth, and one horn on the nose.  The spikes were arranged differently for each individual. Styracosaurus had a beak to eat plants and fossil beds show tracks where multiple individuals walked together and laid eggs together. Functioning in groups allowed them to defend themselves from predators and to be less vulnerable. Miller said the Styracosaurus functioned ecologically like today’s rhino.

 

The Dilophosaurus, whose name means “Two-ridged Lizard” was 20 feet long and about 6 feet tall. It was a medium sized, fish-eating dinosaur that scavenged.

 

Tyrannosaurus Rex, or T-Rex, means “Tyrant Lizard King” and is one of today’s most recognizable dinosaur species.  Most of the specimens of T-Rex were found in fossil beds in Montana and South Dakota.  One of the largest land carnivores, a full-grown T-Rex was 40 feet long and 13 feet high. “Many thought that the T-Rex was an active hunter but evidence supports the hypothesis that they were mostly scavengers,”  said Miller.  Because T-Rex was one of the most recent dinosaurs to go extinct, its bones were well-preserved and a great deal is known about it.

 

The Parasaurolophus, whose name means “Near Crested Lizard” was a herbivore that walked on four legs to forage for food and ran on two legs. Parasaurolophus had beak-like mouths for breaking down grasses and ate in groups to avoid predation, functioning ecologically the same as a herd of gazelles today.  Specimens were found in North America, from Mexico to Canada.

 

Dinosaur Exhibit at the Good Zoo at Oglebay

The Deltadromeus, whose name means ‘River Runner’ has claimed the top of the wetlands waterfall at the Good Zoo at Oglebay as his prehistoric perch for the summer.

“The Deltadromeus, whose name means ‘River Runner’ has claimed the top of the wetlands waterfall as his prehistoric perch for the summer,” said Miller. Deltadromeus was also a carnivore and walked on two legs, and was about 30 feet long.  Very few have been found and only partial skeletons can be studied, so not much is known about this species. For a close up view of the Deltadromeus Miller suggested a train ride but the creature can be seen and heard from the wetlands.

 

The zoo is currently open daily from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.  Admission to the Good Zoo is $9.00 for adults; $5.75 for children ages 3-12; and Good Zoo members and ages 2 and under are admitted free.  Lorikeet Landing and the train ride are open Saturday and Sunday from 10:30 am to 3:30 pm, weather permitting.  The train ride is $2.25 per person and a cup of nectar to feed to the lorikeets is $1.00.  Visit the Good Zoo website to view a video on the dinosaurs and for more zoo details including dinosaur-themed summer camps. The dinosaurs go extinct on Labor Day.

 

The dinosaurs are from Billings Productions, North America’s leading provider of life-size animatronic dinosaurs for zoos, museums and theme parks. According to their website the company aims to encourage discovery and create awareness of prehistoric life in both young and old by making learning fun and entertaining.