Archive for April, 2013

Oglebay Hilltop Shops Celebrate Spring

Discover Spring at Oglebay Palm Room

Kim Young, Horticulture Technician and AAS All-American Selections Display Garden Coordinator, displays a designer container at Oglebay’s Palm Room and Greenhouses. Designer Containers and Deer Resistant Plants and Chemicals is one of the special lectures scheduled during “Dream … Discover Spring at the Hilltop” on Saturday May 4 and Sunday May 5, 2013.

On Saturday, May 4 and Sunday, May 5, 2013, the Palm Room and Greenhouses, Farmhouse Sweets and Treats Shoppe, and Carriage House Glass Shops at Oglebay will celebrate May with “Dream … Discover Spring at the Hilltop.”  Marilyn Archer, Palm Room and Greenhouse/Garden Manager said all the hilltop shops are filled with new arrivals for Spring including new flowering plants and merchandise at the Palm Room, and new fresh-made fudge at Farmhouse Sweets and Treats Shoppe.

 

Archer said the celebration will take place on both days from 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. with giveaways and lectures.  The lectures will take place at the Palm Room and Saturday’s schedule is: 11:00 a.m. – Fantasy Miniature Gardens; 1:00 p.m. – Succulent Wreaths, Living Walls and Kokedama Moss Balls; 2:00 p.m. – Composting, Herbs and Vegetables; 3:00 p.m. – Designer Containers and Deer Resistant Plants and Chemicals.

 

Sunday’s lectures at the Palm Room are: 11:00 a.m. – Succulent Wreaths, Living Walls and Kokedama Moss Balls; 1:00 p.m. – Fantasy Miniature Gardens; 2:00 p.m. – All American Selection Plants; 3:00 p.m. – Designer Containers and Deer Resistant Plants and Chemicals.

 

“Visitors will have the chance to win a beautiful gift basket at the Palm Room, a gift basket at Farmhouse Sweets and Treats and decorative glass at Carriage House Glass,” added Archer.

 

For more information call 304-243-4098.

Good Zoo at Oglebay Offers Exclusive Safari to Tanzania

An informative meeting about the Safari to Tanzania will be held at the Good Zoo on Saturday, April 27 at 1:30 p.m. The meeting will include photographs, food, packing tips and provide answers to all questions!

Good Zoo at Oglebay Offers Exclusive Safari to Tanzania

Penny Miller, Director of the Good Zoo at Oglebay, with several members of a Maasai village during a safari in Africa. The zoo is offering another exclusive safari to Tanzania this fall that will include some of the best wildlife spotting on the continent.

The Good Zoo is offering an exclusive safari to Tanzania. The trip will be fully escorted by Penny Miller, Director of the Good Zoo, from October 27 to November 8, 2013.  “This trip will allow you to discover quintessential African landscapes when you explore Tanzania, the perfect East African destination for any traveler with an open mind and heart to experiencing wildlife and culture, past and present,” said Miller. “A relaxed attitude combined with some of the best wildlife spotting on the continent is within affordable reach.”  Miller has led previous zoo safaris to Kenya, South Africa, Botswana, Zimbabwe and Zambia.

 

This exclusive safari will cover unforgettable spots including the unique eco-system of Ngorongoro Crater, the vast savannahs of the Serengeti, and the flamingo-lined shores of Lake Manyara.  Visitors can expect to see a variety of wildlife including buffalo, wildebeest, impala, giraffe, zebra, black-maned lions, black rhinos and the elusive tree-climbing lions with glimpses of leopard, cheetah, hyena, jackal, elephant, and warthog. The trip will also include a visit to Olduvai Gorge where the roots of modern man were unearthed by the Leakeys, plus a visit to a Maasai village.

 

Good Zoo at Oglebay Offers Exclusive Safari to TanzaniaInclusions to the safari:

  • Flights within Africa as specified. On the main safari in Tanzania: Serengeti to Arusha. On the extension, flight between Arusha/Zanzibar.
  • Superior accommodations throughout.
  • All meals on safari in Tanzania as well as in Zanzibar.
  • All wildlife viewing by private 4X4 vehicle with photo roof, driven by a naturalist guide. A window seat is guaranteed.
  • Visit to a Maasai village.
  • Complimentary bottled water in vehicles and during meals.
  • Professional naturalist will accompany the group with 10 travelers on the main safari.
  • Penny Miller will accompany the group with a minimum 10 travelers on the main tour and 6 travelers on the extension.
  • All applicable hotel and lodge taxes and gratuities.
  • All park entry fees.
  • Complimentary passport wallets and luggage tags.

 

Good Zoo at Oglebay Offers Exclusive Safari to TanzaniaThe cost of the trip is $5,695 per person for double occupancy plus $2,200 per person for round trip air from Pittsburgh.  An optional six day extension to Zanzibar from November 7 to 12, 2013 is an additional $2,195 per person.

 

For the full itinerary and to make reservations visit the Good Zoo website or contact Penny Miller at the Good Zoo by calling 304-243-4027.

Rare Wild Dog Birth at Good Zoo

African wild dog pups born at Good Zoo at Oglebay

Two African wild Dog pups that were born at the zoo in September 2012 are now on exhibit. African wild dogs are Africa’s second most endangered carnivores.

Good Zoo staff announced that highly endangered African Wild Dog pups born at the Good Zoo are now on exhibit.  The female “Destiny” gave birth on September 30, 2012 to seven pups; it is the first litter she or her mate “Selous” have produced.

 

“All the pups were full term, but below normal birth weight, and were born with infections that affected their lungs and other organs,” said Good Zoo Manager Mindi White.  “One pup was stillborn due to undeveloped lungs. The remaining pups were pulled for hand-rearing but four pups succumbed to the infection.”  White said the remaining two pups were too weak to nurse from Destiny, so zoo staff located a lactating domestic dog  from the Hancock County Animal Shelter and nursed the pups for several days until she stopped producing milk.  Keepers took the pups back to the parents every day and let them see, hear and smell the pups through the fence to let them know the pups were still alive.

 

African wild dog pups born at Good Zoo at Oglebay

Two African wild dog pups that were born at the Good Zoo in September were nursed by a domestic dog and hand-raised by zoo staff. Penny Miller, zoo director, said this is the first time nursing wild dog pups have been hand-reared by zoo staff, yet kept with the parents during the day.

When the pups were stronger and healthier and the parents were still showing strong parental behaviors, the pups were put back with the parents. The pups still did not nurse adequately from Destiny, so animal care staff took the pups home every night for late night and 2:00 a.m. feedings. The pups were put back with the wild dog parents during the day. “This is the first time nursing wild dog pups have been hand-reared by zoo staff, yet kept with the parents during the day,“  said Penny Miller, zoo director. If the pups had been only hand raised, they imprint on people and do not learn correct wild dog behaviors. “This would have made it impossible to integrate them back into African Wild Dog conservation program, which is the whole point of our breeding efforts,” Miller added.

 

“These pups were born very compromised. It is a miracle two survived, and it is a testimony to the incredible problem solving and tender loving care they received from our keepers and managers,” Miller said.  The domestic dog that helped rear the pups was adopted by a Good Zoo keeper.  African wild dogs are Africa’s second most endangered carnivores. Once found in 39 countries in sub-Saharan Africa, wild dogs are no longer found in 25 countries.  Habitat destruction, rabies and canine distemper spread by local village dogs, and other pressures threaten their survival. Only the dominant female dog in the pack produces pups, litters can be as large as 20 pups.  Other females assist the mother in rearing the pups and catching wild game.  It takes a large healthy pack of wild dogs to hunt enough game to feed large litters; many wild packs are now too small to rear large litters. Pup mortality in the wild is 90%.  There are 125 African wild dogs exhibited in 37 U.S. zoos; approximately 3,500-5,000 remain in the wild.

 

African wild dog pups born at Good Zoo at Oglebay

The entire wild dog family is now on exhibit at the zoo!

The zoo is currently open daily from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.  Admission to the Good Zoo is $9.00 for adults; $5.75 for children ages 3-12; and Good Zoo members and ages 2 and under are admitted free.  Lorikeet Landing and the train ride are open Saturday and Sunday from 10:30 am to 3:30 pm, weather permitting.  The train ride is $2.25 per person and a cup of nectar to feed to the lorikeets is $1.00.  Additional information can be found on the on the Good Zoo website including the new Dinosaur Exhibit featuring life-sized, moving and roaring dinosaurs.

Back from Extinction – Dinosaurs Invade Good Zoo

Dinosaur Exhibit at the Good Zoo at Oglebay

A Juvenile T –Rex roars at the new Dinosaur Exhibit at the Good Zoo at Oglebay. The life-sized, moving and roaring dinosaurs will greet zoo visitors throughout the summer.

Five life-sized dinosaurs, and one off-spring, have arrived at the Good Zoo at Oglebay, and will greet zoo visitors throughout the summer.  “The dinosaurs are fitted with an electric brain so they move and roar, and can be discovered in the woods near the Australian Exhibit,” said Penny Miller, Director of the Good Zoo.

 

Miller said the entire zoo staff has been working with a paleontologist.  “The staff is well-versed on the dinosaurs that are currently on exhibit and are prepared to pass on this information to all visitors,” said Miller.  Paleontologists continue to find new dig sites and new dinosaur species, and advanced tools and new discoveries have led to new conclusions about dinosaurs. “Museums have had to change exhibits numerous times as paleontology forms a more accurate picture of dinosaurs,” said Miller.

 

The dinosaurs at the Good Zoo this summer include a large Styracosaurus and her baby, a Dilophosaurus, a Juvenile T –Rex, a Deltadromeus and Parasaurolophus. The Parasaurolophus is non-robotic so visitors can sit on it and take their photo or video, but all other dinosaurs are robotic and move and roar.

 

Dinosaur Exhibit at the Good Zoo at Oglebay

Vincent O’Leary, educator at the Good Zoo, welcomes visitors to the new Dinosaur Exhibit, and stands in front of the mama Styracosaurus. The staff is well-versed on the dinosaurs that are currently on exhibit and are happy to pass on this information to all visitors.

The Styracosaurus, whose name means “Spiked Lizard” was found in North America and Asia during the late cretaceous period. This species had six large spikes coming from the large frill on the back of the head, two horns on the upper mouth, and one horn on the nose.  The spikes were arranged differently for each individual. Styracosaurus had a beak to eat plants and fossil beds show tracks where multiple individuals walked together and laid eggs together. Functioning in groups allowed them to defend themselves from predators and to be less vulnerable. Miller said the Styracosaurus functioned ecologically like today’s rhino.

 

The Dilophosaurus, whose name means “Two-ridged Lizard” was 20 feet long and about 6 feet tall. It was a medium sized, fish-eating dinosaur that scavenged.

 

Tyrannosaurus Rex, or T-Rex, means “Tyrant Lizard King” and is one of today’s most recognizable dinosaur species.  Most of the specimens of T-Rex were found in fossil beds in Montana and South Dakota.  One of the largest land carnivores, a full-grown T-Rex was 40 feet long and 13 feet high. “Many thought that the T-Rex was an active hunter but evidence supports the hypothesis that they were mostly scavengers,”  said Miller.  Because T-Rex was one of the most recent dinosaurs to go extinct, its bones were well-preserved and a great deal is known about it.

 

The Parasaurolophus, whose name means “Near Crested Lizard” was a herbivore that walked on four legs to forage for food and ran on two legs. Parasaurolophus had beak-like mouths for breaking down grasses and ate in groups to avoid predation, functioning ecologically the same as a herd of gazelles today.  Specimens were found in North America, from Mexico to Canada.

 

Dinosaur Exhibit at the Good Zoo at Oglebay

The Deltadromeus, whose name means ‘River Runner’ has claimed the top of the wetlands waterfall at the Good Zoo at Oglebay as his prehistoric perch for the summer.

“The Deltadromeus, whose name means ‘River Runner’ has claimed the top of the wetlands waterfall as his prehistoric perch for the summer,” said Miller. Deltadromeus was also a carnivore and walked on two legs, and was about 30 feet long.  Very few have been found and only partial skeletons can be studied, so not much is known about this species. For a close up view of the Deltadromeus Miller suggested a train ride but the creature can be seen and heard from the wetlands.

 

The zoo is currently open daily from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.  Admission to the Good Zoo is $9.00 for adults; $5.75 for children ages 3-12; and Good Zoo members and ages 2 and under are admitted free.  Lorikeet Landing and the train ride are open Saturday and Sunday from 10:30 am to 3:30 pm, weather permitting.  The train ride is $2.25 per person and a cup of nectar to feed to the lorikeets is $1.00.  Visit the Good Zoo website to view a video on the dinosaurs and for more zoo details including dinosaur-themed summer camps. The dinosaurs go extinct on Labor Day.

 

The dinosaurs are from Billings Productions, North America’s leading provider of life-size animatronic dinosaurs for zoos, museums and theme parks. According to their website the company aims to encourage discovery and create awareness of prehistoric life in both young and old by making learning fun and entertaining.